Virginia Felony Laws Fairfax Lawyer

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Felonies are defined as crimes that are more serious than class one or A misdemeanors. Felony crimes, like misdemeanor crimes, are arranged in classes depending on the kind of felony crime done. The classes range from class one to class six. The general punishment for felony crimes is either death, a period of time in prison or a hefty fine. The latter case is usually the punishment for the class six, class five and class four felony crimes. The punishment of a period of time in prison can be given to any felony class and the death punishment is usually the punishment for the top class felonies as in class two and class one felonies.

In the state of Virginia, felony laws indicate that there are some crimes that can be recognized as a felony yet are not considered to be from any of the six classes of felony crimes. These felony crimes that are not recognized to be from any of the six classes include rape, grand larceny, the possession of specific drugs with the intention to either replicate or sell, etc. These kinds of felony crimes are not specified to one of the general classes of felony crimes because they carry their own specific range of punishments.

Virginia felony laws state that class six felony crimes are the least serious crimes that fall under the category of felony crimes. These felony crimes include donating blood infected with a virus, violation of a court order, animal abuse, making a reckless action that may endanger other people, etc. The punishment for class six felony crimes is a period in prison that may range from one to six years.

Some crimes that are recognized as class six felony crimes may face the punishment that is specified for class one misdemeanor crimes instead of the original punishment for class six felony crimes. This is due to the fact that class one misdemeanor crimes are the closest to class six felony crimes since they are one step away from each other. This makes some judges treat class six felony crimes as class one misdemeanor crimes and give the crime a similar punishment to the class one misdemeanor crimes. This punishment is a fine of $2500 and/or a period of one year in jail.

Class five felony crimes are one step above class six felony crimes. Examples of class five felony crimes include the extortion of money, causing injury to another person, etc. The punishment for class five felony crimes is a period of jail that ranges from one to ten years.

Class four felony crimes are one step above class five felony crimes. Examples of class four felony crimes include prostitution, kidnapping, manslaughter, etc. The punishment for class four felony crimes is a period in jail that ranges from two to ten years and a fine that may extend to $100,000.

Virginia felony law identifies class three felony crimes as crimes that are more serious than class four felonies. These may include the intention to poison someone, shooting someone, disabling a person with the intent to kill, etc. Class three felony crimes are punishable by a prison sentence that ranges between five to 20 years a fine that may reach but not pass $100,000.

It is identified by Virginia law that crimes that are more serious than class three felonies are said to be either class two or class one felony crimes. Class two felony crimes include burglary using a weapon, causing permanent physical injury to someone, etc. Class one felonies include first-degree murder, etc. The punishment for class two felonies is a period in prison that ranges from 20 years to death and a fine that may reach $100,000. Class one felony crimes are punishable by death or imprisonment for life.

If you need a Virginia Felony Lawyer to help you with your Felony case in Virginia, call us at 888-437-7747. Our Virginia Felony Attorneys can help you.

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